Questions By Member, 23 June 2015
Source: Legislative Assembly of PEI

Dr. Bevan-Baker: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

May I take this opportunity to thank you for your continued insistence on civility in this House.

Some Hon. Members: Hear, hear!

Curriculum delivery improvements

Dr. Bevan-Baker: We recently learned that in addition to significant teacher cuts, there has been a redistribution of tasks between the English Language School Board and the Department of Education, Early Learning and Culture.

Putting aside the increasingly high stress levels and low morale amongst teachers, the School Act clearly states the division of responsibilities, and they are that the department is tasked with development of curriculum and the school board is tasked with its delivery.

A question to the Minister of Education, Early Learning and Culture. Aside from the questions of compliance to the School Act, how does removing the curriculum delivery from the school boards – the governing body directly responsible to those who deliver the curriculum itself, of course, the teachers – actually improve the delivery of that curriculum?

Speaker: The hon. Minister of Education, Early Learning and Culture.

Mr. Perry: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Under the School Act it’s the department’s role to provide leadership in developing curriculum and assessing programs. What we’re doing here is there’s an overlap in positions from the board and the department and we are reorganizing. We’re going to align our resources which we’re going – best achieve our goals which is student learning.

Speaker: The hon. Leader of the Third Party with his first supplementary question.

Small school closures

Dr. Bevan-Baker: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Of course we all want improved student learning, and in rural provinces like ours there are significant challenges in maintaining our small communities as services are lost and as they become increasingly unattractive places for families to live.

Given that it is clear that small schools actually offer some significant benefits that are often lost in larger institutions, can the minister assure rural Islanders that the many smaller schools that are the lifeblood of so many communities on Prince Edward Island will not be closed simply because of the size of their enrollment? [sic]

Speaker: The hon. Minister of Education, Early Learning and Culture.

Mr. Perry: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Last night the English Language School Board put out a policy on rezoning and class composition and that’s a policy that people have an opportunity to participate in and give their voice to. Anybody that wants to have comments can contact the school board with that.

At this time, Mr. Speaker, I can tell you that the department of education has no plans on closing any schools.

Mr. LaVie: We heard that one (Indistinct).

Speaker: The hon. Leader of the Third Party with his second supplementary question.

Education system engagement process

Dr. Bevan-Baker: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I’m sure there are many parents and communities across the Island who are relieved to hear that.

With so many profound changes occurring in our education system and with so many new models of education gaining favour across the world, will this minister commit to a meaningful engagement process beyond the advisory boards that involves all stakeholders – that’s the entire community, the students, the teachers, the educators, the administrators – so that we can create a system here on Prince Edward Island that is creative and flexible and which will meet our unique needs and situation?

Thank you.

Speaker: The hon. Minister of Education, Early Learning and Culture.

Mr. Perry: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

We are doing that at the present time and we will do more of it. Our stakeholders, as I said earlier today, and I’ve said on many occasions, their input is very important. Whether it is the parents, the teachers, the communities, the teachers’ federation, the school board and our department – everybody has valuable input and we have been having conversations. We are open to having more dialogue. Anything that we can do to better improve our school system, we’re open for it.

Thank you.

 

One Comment

  1. Bill Kays 17 June 2016 at 3:43 pm

    To listen to UPEI’s ads on tv it all makes sense, our goals are to create GLOBAL citizens. We do not educate in this province or country. Instead, we indoctrinate our defenseless children. We don’t educate them, we train them. Curriculum is more important than having a good teacher or a good school. Delivery of curriculum, a proper curriculum is of utmost importance, as a child can learn without the ‘help’ of an indoctrinator, and some might argue achieve a better education. through exploration and discovery. One thing is certain, those being trained currently are going to find it increasingly difficult to find a job, and pay off the debt. I would ask old Wadey boy this ‘What constitutes an education’ and where should a person go to get one?

     

Leave a Reply